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Research National Gallup-Purdue Index Reveals Improved Well-Being Among U.S. College Graduates Who Joined Fraternities and Sororities Results for the Gallup-Purdue Index are based on online surveys conducted Feb. 4-March 7, 2014, with a random sample of 29,560 respondents with a bachelor’s degree or higher, aged 18 and older, with Internet access, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. This included 5,137 fraternity and sorority members. The North-American Interfraternity Conference and National Panhellenic Conference partnered with Gallup for this first-of-its-kind study. When it comes to being engaged at work and experiencing high well-being after graduation, a new Gallup-Purdue University Index study of U.S. college graduates found that graduates who are members of fraternities or sororities are more likely to thrive in all five elements of well-being during their post-graduate years than those graduates who did not join. The study revealed that respondents identifying themselves as members of fraternities and sororities—16 percent of respondents indicated that they were a member of a national fraternity or sorority while attending college—scored better in overall well-being, workplace engagement, collegiate support, experiential learning and alumni attachment. Overall Well-Being Graduates who participated in fraternities or sororities are slightly more likely to be thriving in all five critical elements of well-being—purpose, social, financial, physical and community—than are graduates who did not participate in fraternities or sororities. Workplace Engagement National results show 43% of college graduates...

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